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17 October 2007 @ 02:21 pm
Mad Scientist of the Day  
Someone finally found a use for the PS/3.
 
 
I feel: impressedimpressed
 
 
 
Christopher Bradleycpxbrex on October 17th, 2007 09:40 pm (UTC)
I actually forwarded this to my wife, as her department has the same sort of problems, hehe.
(Deleted comment)
Tombfyretombfyre on October 17th, 2007 10:49 pm (UTC)
Well thats damn neat. ^^ You gotta wonder if this will lead Sony into making some super-computers of their own.
Hafochafoc on October 17th, 2007 10:57 pm (UTC)
D'OH! I've said for years that games are what thrash home computers. I've said for years that the only reason a home user would need something approaching supercomputer power would be to play some of the graphics-intense games. But it never occurred to me that meant that a dedicated, high-powered game machine was actually a...
silussa on October 18th, 2007 04:01 am (UTC)
People tend to overlook what things ARE in favor of what their FUNCTION is.

The G-Site cash register is a prime example. I was told by the trainer when they were first installed that they are not computers. This while watching a BIOS boot-up screen.

"Uh-huh. Okay, if you say so."

Admittedly, it's not much of a computer (the hardware is highly restricted by built-in software checks, so it's well out of date), but given the computing demands of games...it makes sense.

Shadow Dragonshdragon on October 17th, 2007 11:15 pm (UTC)
[insert obligatory Sony-bashing comment along the lines of "that's all they're good for" here]

But that's some seriously cool stuff, actually. And shows just how much OOMPH Sony squeezed into those things. Goes a ways towards explaining why they cost more than a house at least.

Still aren't worth it yet, though. ;)
Araquan Skytracer: Unixaraquan on October 17th, 2007 11:28 pm (UTC)
People did that with the PS2 as well, back in its early days when it was appreciably more CPUy than equivalent desktop PCs. Sony's encouraged Linux computing on both, though much more so with the 3 I'd argue. I'm looking to get one myself at some point and mostly for computing- though what I do most of the time probably wouldn't take huge advantage of the various cores in the Cell chip- it's not quite a normal multicore in the sense of a desktop chip, but probably closer to... A chip with several pipelined vector processing units (think Intel SSE). Some things will benefit greatly from that kind of processing, and others not so much.
silussa on October 18th, 2007 06:07 am (UTC)
And now they're selling the part of their business that makes the chips for the PS/3.

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2007-10-18-sony-toshiba_N.htm
SilverClawbfdragon on October 19th, 2007 01:29 am (UTC)
I think the chip itself was designed by Sony and IBM. There were prototype servers from IBM that used a chip based on the Cell one, but I don't know if that ever made it to market.

Still, I think it's pretty cool that the Sony platform is so open (at least compared to other consoles).